Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and facial nerve paralysis associated with low-voltage electrical shock

February 12, 2014
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Abstract

Electrical injuries can occur as a result of contact with low- or high-voltage electricity. Low-voltage injuries are more common, as they usually occur in the home, but reports in the literature are few. After exposure to electric current, almost every organ system in the body is affected. The severity of an injury depends on many factors, including the type of current, the duration of exposure, and the resistance of the tissue involved. Reported cases of hearing loss and facial nerve paralysis associated with low-voltage electrical shock are rare, and minimal information is available about this circumstance. In this article, the author describes a case of low-voltage electrical shock in a 20-year-old man. To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first report in the literature of a resolution of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and facial nerve paralysis caused by a low-voltage electrical shock.

Introduction

Electrical shock is a relatively uncommon form of trauma, and reports in the literature are relatively sparse. In 1997, Cherington et al reported that in the United States, electrical shock was responsible for 7% of all deaths due to job-related trauma.1

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