Surgical treatment is warranted in aggressive central giant cell granuloma: A report of 2 cases

March 1, 2009
| Reprints

Abstract

Central giant cell granuloma (CGCG) is a benign but locally destructive lesion of the mandible or maxilla that presents most often in the second and third decades of life. Reports of treatment include curettage or complete en bloc resection and nonsurgical approaches such as intralesional steroid injections, interferon alfa-2a, and calcitonin. We describe the cases of 2 young adults with CGCG of the maxilla involving the palate. The first patient, an 18-year-old man, was initially treated with a partial maxillectomy via a facial degloving approach and a postoperative series of transoral intralesional steroid injections to the site of the residual hard palate disease. The partial maxillectomy achieved a near-total debulking of the mass and immediate cosmetic improvement, and the steroid injections resulted in initial regression of the residual disease. However, the patient experienced a recurrence 8 months postoperatively, so a bilateral total inferior maxillectomy via a facial degloving approach was performed with subsequent placement of an obturator. No recurrence was seen 15 months following revision surgery. In view of the incomplete resolution of disease with the use of steroid injections in the first patient, we treated the second patient, a 22-year-old woman, with a subtotal maxillectomy without steroid injection. No recurrence of disease was noted 12 months postoperatively. We conclude that a combination of partial surgical resection and intralesional steroid injection may not be sufficient for the treatment of large CGCGs of the maxilla. Complete surgical resection should be considered for the initial treatment of CGCG, particularly in aggressive cases.

ENT Journal provides full text articles to our registered members.
Please log in or sign up for a FREE membership to view the full content:

You may also like to: