Primary solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma of the tongue

July 5, 2012
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Abstract

Extramedullary plasmacytomas are rare malignancies. Most cases (80%) are seen in the head and neck region, where they represent 1% of all head and neck malignancies. We report a case of an extramedullary plasmacytoma of the tongue that was treated successfully with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. The patient was a 50-year-old woman who was admitted to our hospital with bilateral pain and ulceration on the sides of her tongue. Findings on magnetic resonance imaging and positron-emission tomography did not demonstrate any mass within the tongue or any lymphatic or distant metastasis. A tissue biopsy identified a plasma cell neoplasm. The patient was treated with a total dose of 50 Gy delivered in 2-Gy daily fractions. After 54 months of post-treatment follow-up, she exhibited no sign of systemic myeloma or local recurrence. This case is presented not only for the rarity of the tumor type, but also for its unusual location.

Introduction

Solitary plasmacytomas and extramedullary plasmacytomas are rare malignancies, accounting for less than 5% of all plasma cell neoplasms.1,2While they can originate at any extramedullary site, most cases (80%) are seen in the head and neck region, where they represent 1% of all head and neck malignancies.3,4Plasmacytomas have a predilection for men (male-to-female ratio: 3:1), and most patients are aged 50 to 70 years at presentation.5,6

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CitationEar Nose Throat J. 2012 July;91(7):292-295