Lung herniation: An unusual cause of dysphagia

December 20, 2013
| Reprints

Abstract

Lung herniation is a rare condition that can be classified on the basis of location and etiology. We report an unusual case of right apical lung herniation presenting with dysphagia. Computed tomography of the neck demonstrated an air-containing structure in the root of the right side of the neck, related to but separate from the anteromedial aspect of the right lung apex. The diagnosis of an apical lung hernia was confirmed using high-resolution CT reconstructions. This case highlights that, although uncommon, apical lung hernias should always be considered when investigating abnormalities of swallowing. Identification of an apical lung hernia on plain chest radiographs avoids further unnecessary investigations and surgical intervention. Knowledge of their presentation may avoid complications that could arise from neck interventions such as subclavian central catheter insertion.

Introduction

Lung herniation is a rare condition that can be classified on the basis of location and etiology. We report an unusual case of right apical lung herniation presenting with dysphagia. This case highlights that, although uncommon, apical lung hernias should be considered when investigating abnormalities of swallowing.

ENT Journal provides full text articles to our registered members.
Please log in or sign up for a FREE membership to view the full content:

You may also like to: