Facial nerve palsy associated with a cystic lesion of the temporal bone

March 18, 2014
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Abstract

Facial nerve palsy results in the loss of facial expression and is most commonly caused by a benign, self-limiting inflammatory condition known as Bell palsy. However, there are other conditions that may cause facial paralysis, such as neoplastic conditions of the facial nerve, traumatic nerve injury, and temporal bone leions. We present a case of facial nerve palsy concurrent with a benign cystic lesion of the temporal bone, adjacent to the tympanic segment of the facial nerve. The patient's symptoms subsided after facial nerve decompression via a transmastoid approach.

Introduction

Facial nerve palsy results in the loss of facial expression and is most commonly caused by a benign, self-limiting inflammatory condition known as Bell palsy.1 However, other conditions may result in injury of the seventh cranial nerve, such as neoplastic conditions of the facial nerve, traumatic nerve injury, and temporal bone lesions.

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