Congenital os vomer agenesis: Case report and literature review

March 31, 2012
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Abstract

Defects of the nasal septum occur as a result of a variety of causes, including tuberculosis, irritation, neoplasia, trauma, infection, and chronic inflammatory diseases. Congenital os vomer agenesis as a cause is very rare. We report the case of a 28-year-old man with a defect in the posteroinferior part of the nasal septum that was discovered incidentally during a routine endoscopic examination. The patient was diagnosed with congenital os vomer agenesis, and the diagnosis was confirmed by computed tomography. We discuss the features of this case and review the literature on this rare anomaly.

Introduction

The nasal septum is composed of the os vomer, the crests of the palatine and maxillary bones, the perpendicular lamina of the ethmoid bone, and quadrilateral septal cartilage.1 Defects in the nasal septum can be caused by many different factors; among them are tuberculosis, irritation, neoplasia, trauma, infection, and chronic inflammatory diseases such as syphilis and Wegener granulomatosis.2 A rare cause is congenital agenesis of the os vomer.

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