Bacteriology and antimicrobial susceptibility of ENT infections in a tropical hospital

June 8, 2014
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Abstract

We conducted a retrospective observational study to determine the spectrum and antibiotic sensitivity pattern of organisms isolated in otorhinolaryngologic (ORL) infections. We reviewed the laboratory culture and sensitivity records of 4,909 patients-2,773 males (56.5%) and 2,136 females (43.5%), aged 2 to 90 years (mean: 45.3 ± 12.6)-who had been seen at two government hospitals in Malaysia. Of this group, 4,332 patients had a respiratory tract infection (88.2%), 206 had an ear infection (4.2%), 188 had a deep neck infection (3.8%), and 183 had an oropharyngeal infection (3.7%). The most common isolated organisms were Klebsiella spp, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-susceptible S aureus, coagulase-negative S aureus, and Acinetobacter baumannii. We also identified the antimicrobial susceptibility of these organisms. We conclude that since the spectrum of causative pathogens in some infections differs between tropical and nontropical areas of the world, tropical hospitals should not completely adopt the antibiotic guidelines for ORL infections that have been recommended for hospitals in nontropical regions. We hope that our review and analysis of local data will help practitioners in Malaysia develop an appropriate prescribing policy with respect to ORL pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibility. The goal is to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with these infections.

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